A fresh look at the terminal in Port Rowan

A fellow hobbyist got in touch yesterday to ask if he could use an overall photo of my layout in a presentation he’s doing at a convention in his area – and I was happy to oblige. But I realized that I didn’t have a suitable, current photograph. So off to Port Rowan I went, to shoot a few options for him.

Those are now on the way to him via email, but since I haven’t shared photos of the layout in a while, I thought I’d post them here too.

This photo provides a nice overview of the terminal at Port Rowan. I’ve shot this vantage point before, but not since adding trees to both the left (backdrop) and right (fascia) sides of the yard:

Port Rowan overview

This is another shot I’ve taken before, looking along the turntable lead towards the yard entrance. I like it better now that I have those two large trees in place to the left of the track:

Port Rowan turntable

Here’s a photo of Port Rowan taken from across the aisle at St. Williams. It’s a good overview that emphasizes the spread-out nature of this small branchline terminal:

Port Rowan overview

This next photo is another shot I frequently take – looking up the line from end of track in Port Rowan, at track level. I’ve always liked this shot, but it’s even better with extra trees to frame the scene – including additional trees across the aisle in St. Williams:

Port Rowan - along the track

This final photo is probably the best one to illustrate how the layout fits into the room, but it’s also the weakest in terms of composition – in no small part because the end of the peninsula (closest to the camera) is so unfinished compared to the rest of the layout. The Lynn Valley is out of view to the upper right.

Port Rowan - from end of peninsula

Every so often, I need to photograph the layout to make a record of the progress that I’ve made on it. But I haven’t been doing that lately as other things have taken priority. So I’m grateful that I was approached about sharing some images – and flattered that someone would want to use my layout to illustrate a point in their clinic.

See you at The Austin Eagle!

Austin Eagle Banner

I’m putting the finishing touches on the presentations I’ll be delivering at The Austin Eagle – the NMRA Lone Star Region’s 2018 convention being held June 13-17 in Austin, Texas. If you’re in the area and want to attend, click on the banner, above, to head straight to the convention website.

I’ll be delivering two presentations…

For the Saturday night banquet, I’ll be offering up some thoughts about where the hobby is going, where we’ll find the next generation of serious hobbyists, and what we can do to foster them.

For many of us, the hobby is more than a way to kill time. It’s a lifelong journey of friendships and learning. We love this hobby ‐ and many of us wonder how we can encourage more people to join us as railway modeling enthusiasts. In particular, we wonder how we’re going to reach younger people. Based on my experience in my professional life as a corporate speech writer, I’ve garnered some insights into the demographic known as The Millennials. I’m going to share some thoughts on how we connect with a cohort that has never known a world in which the Internet did not exist, and who many dismiss ‐ wrongly ‐ as being “more interested in playing games on their phones than in building things”. I’ll also offer some suggestions about how we make our hobby relevant to more people ‐ especially these Millennials ‐ at a time when few people encounter real trains on a daily basis.

Since I’m making the trip for the banquet anyway, I’ve also offered to speak about my layout – but recognizing that an S scale Canadian-themed branch line will be of little interest to many at a regional convention in Texas, I’m using my layout as a jumping off point to talk about working in a minority scale.

In my clinic, I’ll share the opportunities and challenges of modeling a specific prototype in a minority scale. I’ll cover how I ended up in a less popular scale and how that influenced my decision when choosing a prototype. I’ll offer suggestions for others to research and ponder to determine whether a niche scale is a viable one in which to work. Anybody who has ever considered switching scales or who is interested in working in a second scale can benefit from this clinic.

I’ve never been to Texas. I’m looking forward to visiting Austin and putting some faces to some names at the convention: maybe yours will be one of them!

No NERPM for me this year

Well, nuts.

Things did not work out. Something has come up and I won’t be able to attend the New England / Northeast RPM June 1-2 in Enfield, Connecticut.

I was really looking forward to it, but life sometimes gets in the way of trains.

No need to send best wishes, etc. It’s all good. But if you want to take my place, there’s a clinic slot open at 9am on the Friday…

South Paris Switcher

My friend Ryan Mendell is embarking on a new layout project. Having freelanced for many years, building his delightful Algonquin Railway, Ryan has now been bitten by the prototype bug and is going to build an HO layout based on the Grand Trunk Railway in Maine.

Click on the image, below, to visit his new blog and have a look around. It’s worth the trip!

South Paris Switcher - Header

(I’ve disabled comments on this post, because any comments about Ryan’s new project should really go on his blog.)

CNR 3737 :: more tender work

Someone recently asked me how work was progressing on the CNR 3737 project. The short answer was, “It wasn’t”. The long answer was that Andy Malette and I were both busy with other things and just couldn’t find a free Friday that worked for both of us. That’s fine – it’s a hobby: It fits between the other things in life.

But after a long hiatus, we managed to get together last week and make some progress. This time around, I added railings to the tender:

CNR 3737 Tender Railings

I marked locations for stanchions and soldered a bunch of brass strip in place, leaving each piece longer than needed. I then soldered the railing to the stanchions, using a scrap of strip wood as a non-conductive spacer to make sure they railing was a consistent distance off the tender walls.

My prototype has separate railings along the coal bin, whereas the locomotive Andy is building has one continuous rail that follows the lines from the coal bin down to the rear deck, around the back and back up the other side. I definitely had the easier project.

The rear railing is actually two pieces, soldered in place then trimmed to meet on the stanchion next to the ladder at the back of the tender. the railings simply end behind the coal bin walls.

CNR 3737 Tender Rails

On one of the coal bin railings, a couple of brass fittings are soldered in place at each end. These are the electrical plug-ins for the rear light, which will go on the water tank deck.

After shooting these photos, I did some clean-up. I filed the stanchions flush with the top of the railing. In the process, I managed to break a couple of the solder joints, but the repairs were quick – thanks, in part, to my new low-profile vise, which opens enough to hold an S scale tender body, and which can be used as the grounding point for my resistance soldering unit.

It’s nice to be back at this project. It’s taken a long time and I’m now at the stage where I want to get it done and move onto the next thing. Plus, of course, I want to see the locomotives in action on the S Scale Workshop exhibition layout!

Weathering Heights

What’s special about this CNR ballast hopper?

CNR Ballast Hopper

My friend Matthieu Lachance weathered it using techniques found in the military modelling hobby. Matthieu writes about the experience – and how it’s different from the typical approach employed by railway modelling enthusiasts – on his Hedley Junction blog. Click on the image, above, to read more – it’s worth the trip!

(Rather than steal the discussion, I’ve disabled comments on this post. Join in on Matthieu’s blog, instead!)

As an aside, Pierre Oliver and I just shot a series of segments on weathering for TrainMasters TV, including one on using washes by military supply company AK Interactive. Those segments will air later this year.

Ermagerd!

“Ermagerd! I’m at the trrrn shrrr!”

Ermagerd!

All appearances to the contrary, I’m having a great time at the 2018 Great British Train Show. To find out why, click on the photo.

UPDATE: The organizers had a video produced at the show. It’s a nice overview of what was on offer. Roweham appears starting around 22:50…

A precise vise

Soba vise

Last week, I visited my friend Pierre Oliver to help him draw out the first town for his new layout, full-size on the benchwork. I’ve written extensively about that trip on my Achievable Layouts blog, so I won’t repeat it here. You can visit that blog and read about our work session by clicking on this photo of an SP freight working the Clovis branch:

SP - Clovis branch freight.

But on the way to Pierre’s, I happened to pass a Busy Bee Tools store and recalled that my friend William Flatt has a nifty vise he uses to bench photo-etched brass kits – something I’m going to be doing a lot of as I contemplate my switch to modelling the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway in 1:64.

Fortunately, I’d had the foresight to take a photo of William’s vise when I visited him to collect some detail parts and trolley poles. In fact, we’d used his vise to bend the door frames for an interurban passenger car and I was very impressed by its ability to securely hold extremely tiny things:

Soba vise and bent door frame.
(That’s a tiny bend to make, but the vise had no problems holding the brass)

So, I made a quick detour into the land of the Bee and came home with my own Soba vise.

I decided the vise needed to be mounted in a way that it was secure when being used, but easy to move when I didn’t need it. So I built a mounting pad out of some spare MDF. I included a lip to hold it snuggly against the edge of my Festool Multi-Function Table, with the vise positioned so I would not bash my knuckles when turning the handle.

Soba vise - mounted.

I also included enough base behind the vise to clamp it to the table through one of the dog holes, keeping the clamp out of the way of any material I might be working in the vise. For this, I had to drill a 3/4″ hole in the masonite cover I use to convert the MFT to a hobby bench. This is located directly over a dog hole to pass a quick-release clamp, and I have a small plug for the hole when the vise is not in use.

The vise has already proven its worth many times in my shop. I recently did some resistance soldering work on a brass model and it securely held the parts. I can even clamp my ground lead to the vise for this type of work. I’m really pleased!

Mark: He’s right, you know…

My friend Mark Zagrodney writes A Model Meander and it’s always worth a read – but his post today really resonates with me, and there’s not a single image of a model railway in sight.

I won’t give away the story, but it involves the important role that slippers play in the hobby.

Enjoy if you visit – and while you’re there, have a look around at what Mark is doing. I always enjoy the visit.

I made a washer!

Okay, it’s a humble beginning, but…

Washer-Lathe

Last night, my friend Ryan Mendell visited. Ryan is a brilliant machinist, and he offered to give me some instruction on my recently-acquired Sherline lathe. We didn’t worry about measurements, but we talked about set-up and adjustment of the tools and tool holders, then worked through the four basic operations one performs on a lathe – facing, turning, boring, and parting. By the end of the lesson I had the small brass washer pictured above.

What a wonderful experience. I can’t wait to make something else!