CNR 3640 in RMC

RS18-Potrait

I’ve written a feature for Railroad Model Craftsman magazine about my model of CNR RS-18 3640 (shown above). This is an Overland brass import from many years ago, which I tuned so it would run better. I then made some basic cosmetic changes and added DCC, sound (with two speakers) and lights. I then painted the model – including creating my own masks for colour separation.

You can read about the model in the October, 2019 issue of RMC. Click on the cover to visit the RMC website:

RMC Oct 2019 cover

“Buzzard” at the World of Film International Festival in Glasgow

If you’re in Scotland on October 6th, Buzzard – the short dramatic film shot partially in my layout room last summer – will be enjoying its film festival premiere at the World of Film International Festival in Glasgow. It is competing against 16 other shorts from around the world.

Joy and Filip at Port Rowan
(Joy and Filip discuss a shot overlooking Port Rowan. Click on the image to read all the posts about this film…)

In other news, Joy’s 2017 film – the award-winning Game – is now available for viewing via Omeleto on YouTube. And you can still catch In The Weeds – another award-winner, from 2015 – on Vimeo.

I am super excited for director Joy Webster, co-writer Ben O’Neil, co-producer Lucas Ford, and the rest of the Buzzard cast and crew. And I’d like to once again thank those of you who joined me in backing Buzzard during its fundraising effort last fall. Your contribution helped complete this film, and helped market it to festival selection committees – so it wouldn’t be in Glasgow without you.

I wish Joy the best of luck at the Glasgow festival. I only wish I could attend…

Tight Spot Sanders and Fret Saw Table

Here’s an awesome combination to add to any workshop:

Tight Spot Sanders and Fret Saw Table

I visited my friend Ryan Mendell yesterday. Ryan recently made the jump from hobbyist to hobby business owner by launching National Scale Car. His company’s focus is on rolling stock and detail parts for the HO craftsman kit / RPM market. (And yes, I’m talking to him about the potential for S scale kits and parts…)

But Ryan’s also a pattern-maker and he’s developed some cool tools to help him with pattern making and general model-building. He’ll offer some of these through his business – and his first tool is a small offering that’ll make a big difference:

Tight Spot Sanders - NSC

It’s the Tight Spot Sanders. As Ryan notes on the National Scale Car website…

Sanding in corners or between details can be difficult using sanding sticks with foam cores. Tight Spot Sanders are the answer. They allow one to apply enough pressure while sanding flat against a surface. Ideal for sanding inside corners or between rivet strips on a boxcar when plugging holes.

Made from laser-cut acrylic with a precision machined finger dimple that makes them easy to grip and propel. Sanders can also be propelled with the eraser end of a standard pencil or other such implement.

The Tight Spot Sanders are sold as a set of three, including two pieces of self-adhesive emery paper (180 and 320 grit). Definitely worth the $5.00. (While you’re on the National Scale Car website, be sure to snoop around at Ryan’s other offerings, too.)

In the lead photo, Ryan is demonstrating a Tight Spot sander and is supporting the model on a Fret-Saw Table from Lee Valley. Clamped in a vise, this is a terrific work surface for supporting odd-shaped objects – like a car body with braces in it, as shown. I’m definitely adding one of these to the shop next time I visit the Valley of Lee…

“Buzzard”: Thank You!

I’d like to thank everyone who contributed to the Indiegogo campaign to raise money for post-production and film festival costs for Buzzard – the movie by Joy Webster that includes scenes shot in and around my model railway.

Joy and Filip at Port Rowan
(Joy and cinematographer Filip Funk discuss a scene overlooking Port Rowan, during our shooting day in July. Click on the image to read about shooting day.)

Overall, the campaign raised $3,943 – 78% of the goal, which is awesome. Also, 76 people backed the campaign – and I know from looking through the list of backers that a number of those wonderful people… are you!

On behalf of Joy, her actors and her crew, thank you so much for this. It means a lot to them, and to me.

Reminder: Backing “Buzzard”

As a reminder, there are only a few days left to help director Joy Webster raise funds for post production work on for her short drama, Buzzard. This included a day of filming in my layout room and workshop.

Even a modest contribution, like $10, would mean a lot to Joy – and to me.

I’ve never asked for a dime for the blogs I’ve written over the past seven years – but if you’ve enjoyed Port Rowan in 1:64, or Achievable Layouts, or my other blogs, and are looking for a way to express that appreciation, a $10 investment to Buzzard would be a terrific way to do that. If fifty of us gave $10 each, that would put Joy and her team way over the top. I’ve already contributed, of course.

You can view the trailer – and become a backer – by clicking on the image, below:

Buzzard-ShootingDay

Thanks in advance for considering this – and thank you if you have already made a contribution. Enjoy the trailer if you watch!

“Buzzard” by Joy Webster (Trailer)

Back in July, I hosted director Joy Webster and her crew for a day of film shooting in my layout room and workshop. This week, Joy released the first trailer for the film, called Buzzard. You can view the trailer – part of a fundraising campaign to finish the film – by clicking on the image, below:

Buzzard-Trailer

While the trailer only includes a brief shot taken on my layout, Joy and her team filmed more than two dozen shots in my workshop and layout room and it will feature more in the final film. In fact, Joy and cinematographer Filip Funk visited on Sunday to film a few more shots on the layout – and overview, and close-ups – to fill out some of the scenes.

The film is not about model railways – or railway modelling – but the layout is an important ice-breaker in the relationship between the two main characters, Hanna and Frank. The Indiegogo page for the trailer includes more information about Buzzard, including the following description of the film:

Buzzard is a film about the fragility of the human conscience, and the corrupt corporate system that threatens it. It’s about two very different characters that have both been manipulated by corporations to their own detriment. Hannah is a young girl who is recently out to make it on her own and trying to navigate through life, and Frank an older man who has given up on his own life after losing his daughter and sinking into depression. Both are vulnerable to the overarching corporate trap – Hannah as a young person trying to pay her bills who gets roped into working for the corrupt company, and Frank as a man struggling with depression who becomes one of the company’s prey.

I am thrilled to have had the opportunity to play a small part in the creation of this film and can’t wait to see it! It’s only natural that I’ve invested in the Indiegogo campaign – because I really want to see this project finished. And no, I’m not asking you to do contribute, but of course if you wish to do so (even as little as Cdn$10), I know it would be greatly appreciated.

And while I’ve never asked for a dime for the blogs I’ve written over the past seven years, if you’ve enjoyed Port Rowan in 1:64 and are looking for a way to express that appreciation, a Cdn$10 investment to Buzzard would be a terrific way to do that. If fifty of us gave $10 each, that would put Joy and her team way over the top.

Thanks in advance for considering it. And enjoy the trailer if you watch!

A pair of Seltzers

Well, I’m honoured!

Seltzers x2

Yesterday’s post included a pleasant gift. This website won the 2018 Josh Seltzer Award from the National Association of S Gaugers. Thank you to everyone who made this possible!

As the photo above shows, my blog also won in 2016. Not to make light of these awards, but if I win every other year I’m going to quickly run out of wall space. So here’s the challenge:

If you’re modelling in S scale, and you haven’t already done so… start a blog.

Share your progress on models. Give us a tour of your layout. Share your thoughts on the state of the hobby in general, and of S scale in particular. (If you need some ideas about how to start, check out my post, “Why you should consider blogging“.)

Let others know you’re doing this so they can follow along – by cross-posting to the S Scale newsgroups, S Scale SIG, S Scale groups on social media, etc.

And perhaps in a couple of years, you will be looking for a spot to hang your Josh Seltzer Award!

(Thank you, again, to the members of the NASG for these awards. They’re wonderful!)

“Cue the train…”

Joy W - Film Shoot
(Setting up for a scene – one of more than two dozen shot during a 13-hour day in my basement)

In 1968, artist Andy Warhol wrote in an exhibition programme, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes”. Yesterday, I was fortunate to experience a bit of what that feels like, when my Port Rowan layout was used as a location for a short drama directed by Toronto filmmaker Joy Webster.

Joy checking storyboard
(Joy reviews her storyboard prior to shooting a scene)

Joy contacted me in April via this blog. She’d found my layout online and wrote (in part)…

I’ve been on the hunt for a model railroad setup in a residential home (ideally in a basement) to use as a location for a short film that I am directing this summer … I’d love to get in touch with you and chat about seeing more of your train room and work. Looking forward to hearing from you!

Well, that was pretty much all it took. We arranged a site visit, and she decided almost immediately that the layout worked for her story. (I won’t give away details now – but will update this post when the film is released.)

What’s more, Joy was very accommodating with a couple of important technical requirements on my part.

First, I would be the only person touching the trains or adjusting scenic elements on the layout – I’d be happy to move things about, but of course I know best how to pick them up.

Second, we arranged a meeting with her lighting person to find a lighting solution that would not generate any heat (because aiming traditional film lights at the layout would quickly melt things). In the end, the lighting person found some awesome LED lights that look like a fluorescent tube, but run off a self-contained battery pack, are dimmable, colour-tunable (not only through various colour temperatures of “white” such as indoor and daylight, but also through the full RGB spectrum), and controlled via Bluetooth and an app on a smart phone.

Layout lighting
(Setting up lights on the fascia to create the look of actors being illuminated by the layout lighting. It was very effective!)

Joy and her producer Lucas Ford appreciated the time, effort and money that I’ve invested in my hobby, and they were terrific about making sure I felt comfortable having a film crew of approximately 20 people in the layout room and workshop for the day. For my part, I was thrilled to be able to take part: I studied television in university and while many of the details differ between TV and film, there were enough similarities that I appreciated what was going on (and knew when to shut the heck up), even as it reminded me of what I’m missing as someone who abandoned a career in media and who now works largely by himself.

What’s more, it was an easy decision to welcome this film project in our home. Joy’s work is stunning: Two previous films “Game” (2017) and “In The Weeds” (2015) have garnered multiple film festival awards, and it’s easy to see why. I feel privileged to have worked with her.

Here are some more pictures from the shoot, with permission from Joy to share them:

Reviewing script.
(Joy and one of the actors discuss a scene in my workshop)

Actor and machine tools
(Framed by machine tools, an actor delivers her performance on the basement stairs)

Sound and makeup
(Capturing audio for a shoot on the basement stairs, while the makeup department takes a break in the kitchen)

Backyard
(The baggage wagon in the backyard was an ideal staging area for equipment. That’s Lucas checking his phone at left)

Monitor
(Joy and her crew in my workshop, watching on a monitor as a scene unfolds in the layout room next door. My comfortable workshop chairs were most welcome by the end of the day…)

Final scene
(The actors have been released and Joy’s cinematographer is shooting the final scene of the day. “Cue the train…”)

Thanks, Joy and Lucas, for inviting me to take part in your project. I loved every minute of it – everyone on set was fantastic, professional, and respectful of my work and our home. I look forward to seeing the film when it’s released!

Weathering Heights

What’s special about this CNR ballast hopper?

CNR Ballast Hopper

My friend Matthieu Lachance weathered it using techniques found in the military modelling hobby. Matthieu writes about the experience – and how it’s different from the typical approach employed by railway modelling enthusiasts – on his Hedley Junction blog. Click on the image, above, to read more – it’s worth the trip!

(Rather than steal the discussion, I’ve disabled comments on this post. Join in on Matthieu’s blog, instead!)

As an aside, Pierre Oliver and I just shot a series of segments on weathering for TrainMasters TV, including one on using washes by military supply company AK Interactive. Those segments will air later this year.

California Dreamin’ | Sugar Short Line

Pajaro Valley Consolidated RR Logo
(Click on the image to visit Nick’s new layout blog)

While attending the Ontario Manifest in California earlier this month, I was delighted to meet Nick Lisica. Nick’s modelling is exquisite – he went home from this NMRA regional convention with a number of merit awards and category wins from the contest room, including for this lovely O scale model of a steam-powered stern-wheeler, built from a Train Troll kit with many extra details:

Alexandria by Nick Lisica

But Nick is an N scaler at heart, and has picked an obscure prototype to model. The Pajaro (“Paw-haw-row”) Valley Consolidated Railroad was a narrow gauge line created in the late 19th Century to provide sugar beet farmers in the Salinas Valley with an alternative to the Southern Pacific when transporting their produce to a refinery in Watsonville, CA. Nick’s prototype is modest, making it an achievable layout. But the SP absorbed the line in the 1920s – and the PVCRR’s modest nature and short lifespan means it’s a challenge to find information and photos of the prototype.

Port Rowan is not as obscure – it lasted longer, and later, so there are better photos and records. But I face many of the same challenges in modelling my subject as Nick does in modelling his. So while we spoke at the convention, I suggested to him that he start a blog. I pointed out that by putting his work on the web, he would open it up to search engines and therefore to a broad spectrum of people who may have information.

My experience with Port Rowan in 1:64 bears this out. Obviously, when I started it, the blog was followed primarily by fellow railway modellers (because that’s who I told I was writing a blog). But since then, my readership has grown to include people who are interested in Port Rowan, St. Williams, and the area… people who are related to railway employees on the line, and to those who were customers of the railway… and so on. I’ve received as much useful information from them as I have from those within the hobby. I never know who is going to provide the next piece of the puzzle to help me build the complete picture of the CNR’s Simcoe Sub in the 1950s.

Nick took the comments to heart, and recently emailed to say he’s started a blog about his plans for his N scale home layout. I’ve added it to my links (right side of the home page). You can also visit the Pajaro Valley Consolidated Railroad by clicking on the logo at the top of this page.

(Great to meet you, Nick! I look forward to following your progress online…)