Unfinished business with Robin

Unfinished business 3

The weather outside was frightful but the train room was delightful when my friend Robin Talukdar found himself in town with a couple of hours to kill yesterday, and asked if he could drop by to “run a train”.

We grabbed coffees, talked about Robin’s recent experience operating on the SP Clovis Branch that Pierre Oliver is bringing to life in his basement, and then headed to Port Rowan.

A freight extra was the order of the day, behind CNR 10-wheeler 1532. With four cars in tow, we had a lot of work ahead of us – well, a lot for my layout, anyway.

We sorted the team track at St. Williams, setting off two cars and lifting two others, which we placed on the siding to collect on the return trip.

Unfinished business 5

Unfinished business 4

We then headed down to Port Rowan, where we collected one car while setting off two. We placed a British American tank car on the elevated coal delivery track to aid with unloading fuel for a local dealer, and shuffled a car into the team track. We had one car to lift – one of the Milwaukee Road’s distinctive rib-side boxcars. And we turned the locomotive in preparation for heading back.

Unfinished business 1

At this point, Robin’s window closed so we left things as they lay. The MILW car is on the main, the van is set in front of the station, and the 1532 is on the turntable lead. Next time I have somebody over, we’ll finish the work.

Unfinished business 2

Robin has undertaken several layouts. Currently, he’s working on the Guelph Spur in Proto:48, a line jointly operated by Ontario Southland and GEXR. Go have a look – he’s doing interesting things.

Great to see you, Robin – and sorry we couldn’t visit longer. I look forward to our next get-together!

Dinner Train with Robinson and Ilana, and Bernard and Holly

Train M238 - St. Williams west
CNR M238 emerges from the Lynn Valley as it rolls eastbound into St. Williams

Last night, Mairi and I hosted a dinner party for a couple of couples. An old friend from university, Robinson Kelly and his girlfriend Ilana curious to see my model railway – and because we thought they would make a great addition to the evening, we invited fellow railway modelling enthusiast Bernard Hellen and his wife Holly to join us.

Robinson is not a member of our fine hobby – but he really enjoyed his introduction to it and jumped at the offer to come over sometime to experience an operating session. I will have to think about how to introduce that to someone who is brand new to the hobby, especially since I have developed a lot of operations procedures, materials, paperwork etc. I don’t want to scare him off! Robinson would be an ideal addition to our hobby: He’s smart, curious about the world around him, and has the time and the resources to consider building a layout. We’ll see. I’m not going to push him, though: He’s more than welcome to enjoy the hobby through me and the Simcoe Sub to Port Rowan.

As I noted, Bernard is a fellow hobbyist. He models the Québec Gatineau – a modern G&W-owned short line running between Montréal and Québec City – in HO scale. Bernard’s layout is not as far along as mine, although he has started some scenery and the work he’s done is excellent. I think he enjoyed showing my layout to Holly – it was her first visit – because it gave her an example of what he’s planning to achieve. Holly and Ilana both enjoyed the tour.

Bernard lives relatively close by (at least in Toronto terms): I can walk a half block south of my house, hop on a streetcar, and be in his layout room with no transfers in about 20 minutes. In addition the interest in trains that Bernard and I share, the four of us get along really well – so we need to see more of each other. A lot more.

We had an amazing evening – so amazing, I forgot to take photos while giving the tour. (Thanks to Bernard for sharing the image that leads off this post.)

As I’ve mentioned elsewhere, I don’t build layouts for the trains: I build them for the friendships they foster. As a “social lubricant”, Port Rowan was a huge success last night and I’m definitely looking forward to seeing more of these friends!

“Buzzard”: Thank You!

I’d like to thank everyone who contributed to the Indiegogo campaign to raise money for post-production and film festival costs for Buzzard – the movie by Joy Webster that includes scenes shot in and around my model railway.

Joy and Filip at Port Rowan
(Joy and cinematographer Filip Funk discuss a scene overlooking Port Rowan, during our shooting day in July. Click on the image to read about shooting day.)

Overall, the campaign raised $3,943 – 78% of the goal, which is awesome. Also, 76 people backed the campaign – and I know from looking through the list of backers that a number of those wonderful people… are you!

On behalf of Joy, her actors and her crew, thank you so much for this. It means a lot to them, and to me.

Reminder: Backing “Buzzard”

As a reminder, there are only a few days left to help director Joy Webster raise funds for post production work on for her short drama, Buzzard. This included a day of filming in my layout room and workshop.

Even a modest contribution, like $10, would mean a lot to Joy – and to me.

I’ve never asked for a dime for the blogs I’ve written over the past seven years – but if you’ve enjoyed Port Rowan in 1:64, or Achievable Layouts, or my other blogs, and are looking for a way to express that appreciation, a $10 investment to Buzzard would be a terrific way to do that. If fifty of us gave $10 each, that would put Joy and her team way over the top. I’ve already contributed, of course.

You can view the trailer – and become a backer – by clicking on the image, below:

Buzzard-ShootingDay

Thanks in advance for considering this – and thank you if you have already made a contribution. Enjoy the trailer if you watch!

“Buzzard” by Joy Webster (Trailer)

Back in July, I hosted director Joy Webster and her crew for a day of film shooting in my layout room and workshop. This week, Joy released the first trailer for the film, called Buzzard. You can view the trailer – part of a fundraising campaign to finish the film – by clicking on the image, below:

Buzzard-Trailer

While the trailer only includes a brief shot taken on my layout, Joy and her team filmed more than two dozen shots in my workshop and layout room and it will feature more in the final film. In fact, Joy and cinematographer Filip Funk visited on Sunday to film a few more shots on the layout – and overview, and close-ups – to fill out some of the scenes.

The film is not about model railways – or railway modelling – but the layout is an important ice-breaker in the relationship between the two main characters, Hanna and Frank. The Indiegogo page for the trailer includes more information about Buzzard, including the following description of the film:

Buzzard is a film about the fragility of the human conscience, and the corrupt corporate system that threatens it. It’s about two very different characters that have both been manipulated by corporations to their own detriment. Hannah is a young girl who is recently out to make it on her own and trying to navigate through life, and Frank an older man who has given up on his own life after losing his daughter and sinking into depression. Both are vulnerable to the overarching corporate trap – Hannah as a young person trying to pay her bills who gets roped into working for the corrupt company, and Frank as a man struggling with depression who becomes one of the company’s prey.

I am thrilled to have had the opportunity to play a small part in the creation of this film and can’t wait to see it! It’s only natural that I’ve invested in the Indiegogo campaign – because I really want to see this project finished. And no, I’m not asking you to do contribute, but of course if you wish to do so (even as little as Cdn$10), I know it would be greatly appreciated.

And while I’ve never asked for a dime for the blogs I’ve written over the past seven years, if you’ve enjoyed Port Rowan in 1:64 and are looking for a way to express that appreciation, a Cdn$10 investment to Buzzard would be a terrific way to do that. If fifty of us gave $10 each, that would put Joy and her team way over the top.

Thanks in advance for considering it. And enjoy the trailer if you watch!

“Cue the train…”

Joy W - Film Shoot
(Setting up for a scene – one of more than two dozen shot during a 13-hour day in my basement)

In 1968, artist Andy Warhol wrote in an exhibition programme, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes”. Yesterday, I was fortunate to experience a bit of what that feels like, when my Port Rowan layout was used as a location for a short drama directed by Toronto filmmaker Joy Webster.

Joy checking storyboard
(Joy reviews her storyboard prior to shooting a scene)

Joy contacted me in April via this blog. She’d found my layout online and wrote (in part)…

I’ve been on the hunt for a model railroad setup in a residential home (ideally in a basement) to use as a location for a short film that I am directing this summer … I’d love to get in touch with you and chat about seeing more of your train room and work. Looking forward to hearing from you!

Well, that was pretty much all it took. We arranged a site visit, and she decided almost immediately that the layout worked for her story. (I won’t give away details now – but will update this post when the film is released.)

What’s more, Joy was very accommodating with a couple of important technical requirements on my part.

First, I would be the only person touching the trains or adjusting scenic elements on the layout – I’d be happy to move things about, but of course I know best how to pick them up.

Second, we arranged a meeting with her lighting person to find a lighting solution that would not generate any heat (because aiming traditional film lights at the layout would quickly melt things). In the end, the lighting person found some awesome LED lights that look like a fluorescent tube, but run off a self-contained battery pack, are dimmable, colour-tunable (not only through various colour temperatures of “white” such as indoor and daylight, but also through the full RGB spectrum), and controlled via Bluetooth and an app on a smart phone.

Layout lighting
(Setting up lights on the fascia to create the look of actors being illuminated by the layout lighting. It was very effective!)

Joy and her producer Lucas Ford appreciated the time, effort and money that I’ve invested in my hobby, and they were terrific about making sure I felt comfortable having a film crew of approximately 20 people in the layout room and workshop for the day. For my part, I was thrilled to be able to take part: I studied television in university and while many of the details differ between TV and film, there were enough similarities that I appreciated what was going on (and knew when to shut the heck up), even as it reminded me of what I’m missing as someone who abandoned a career in media and who now works largely by himself.

What’s more, it was an easy decision to welcome this film project in our home. Joy’s work is stunning: Two previous films “Game” (2017) and “In The Weeds” (2015) have garnered multiple film festival awards, and it’s easy to see why. I feel privileged to have worked with her.

Here are some more pictures from the shoot, with permission from Joy to share them:

Reviewing script.
(Joy and one of the actors discuss a scene in my workshop)

Actor and machine tools
(Framed by machine tools, an actor delivers her performance on the basement stairs)

Sound and makeup
(Capturing audio for a shoot on the basement stairs, while the makeup department takes a break in the kitchen)

Backyard
(The baggage wagon in the backyard was an ideal staging area for equipment. That’s Lucas checking his phone at left)

Monitor
(Joy and her crew in my workshop, watching on a monitor as a scene unfolds in the layout room next door. My comfortable workshop chairs were most welcome by the end of the day…)

Final scene
(The actors have been released and Joy’s cinematographer is shooting the final scene of the day. “Cue the train…”)

Thanks, Joy and Lucas, for inviting me to take part in your project. I loved every minute of it – everyone on set was fantastic, professional, and respectful of my work and our home. I look forward to seeing the film when it’s released!

Austin Eagle: Layout tours

My trip to Texas to take part in The Austin Eagle – the NMRA Lone Star Region’s annual convention – included a terrific self-guided tour of area layouts. On the Saturday, a bunch of us hopped into my rental vehicle (a Toyota 4Runner, which had plenty of space for a crew) and hit the highway.

A highlight for me was a visit to the Proto:48 layout being built by master craftsman Jim Zwernemann. I’ve written about this on my Achievable Layouts blog, and you can read that story by clicking on Jim’s GE 70-Tonner, below:

Jim Z - SP 70 Tonner

Another key stop on the layout tour, for me, was the HO scale Santa Fe layout built by noted designer David Barrow. Again, you can read more about that experience on my Achievable Layouts blog, by clicking on the image below:

Barrow - layout tour

In addition to these two layouts, we visited a nice HOn3 layout built by Ben Sargent. Ben’s Santa Fe & San Juan Railroad models the D&RGW’s narrow gauge Chili Line in New Mexico.

Ben Sargent

Ben Sargent
(I liked the false front stock pen – what a neat idea for a minimum-space model!)

Ben Sargent

Sargent Press
(Ben is a retired political cartoonist whose layout shares space with his speciality printing business, run with this 1905-era press. Ben’s press and his collection of type for it garnered as much interest at the layout did!)

We also visited the HO scale MKT Sedalia Division being built by Steve Nelson – covering the line between Franklin Missouri and Parsons, Kansas in the autumn of 1966. Steve is a modeller I can really relate to: he shows restraint in the composition of his scenes, but not trying to crowd too many ideas into a given space. Instead, he devotes proper space to each idea.

For example, note how much space is devoted to these harvest scenes – and how Steve has created vignettes in the fields:

Steve Nelson - Harvest

Steve Nelson - Harvest

Steve Nelson - Harvest

Steve Nelson - Harvest

I was also impressed by this large soybean processing operation. I didn’t realize how many different car types are required to process soybeans and ship various finished products – it’s almost as complex as a paper mill, and would make an excellent subject for a one-industry layout:

Steve Nelson - Soybeans

Steve Nelson - Soybeans

Finally, Steve had a simple but clever homemade device for laying out parallel track. It’s pretty self explanatory:

Steve Nelson - Parallel Track

Thanks to everyone who hosted layout tours. I really enjoyed seeing your work!

Austin Eagle: operating sessions

My trip to Texas to take part in The Austin Eagle – the NMRA Lone Star Region’s annual convention – included a really fun day of operating on local layouts – starting with a session on the HO scale Port of New York Railroad being built by Riley Triggs. You can read about Riley’s layout on my Achievable Layouts blog by clicking on the following image:

PoNY Herald

Later the same day, I took part in a large operating session on the HO scale D&RGW Moffat Route built by David Nicastro and his son, Sam Nicastro. Sam is a millennial who is already passionate about, and accomplished in, our hobby. He’s a modeller, a railfan, and a member of several groups including the Operations Special Interest Group. More than anything I can do, guys like Sam will help keep the hobby strong and viable in the future.

Their layout features a number of advanced electronics applications, including a dispatcher’s desk complete with virtual CTC machine linked into the DCC system and phone system. What’s most remarkable about this is it’s Internet-enabled, so the Nicastros can call upon a friend out of town (or anywhere in the world) to direct traffic during an operating session.

Nicastro DRGW - Dispatchers Office

David’s goal with this layout was to give one the feeling of running a train through the mountains, and he is certainly achieving that. I signed up to run a manifest freight as it would take me the length of the mainline – from terminal to terminal – and it took almost two hours to make the trip, with several pauses along the way to meet opposing trains.

DRGW

DRGW

DRGW - through the mountains

Moffat tunnel

Lift gate

While this is not the sort of layout I would build for myself, I really enjoyed running on it and would be happy to contribute to building and operating the Moffat Route if I lived in the area. Thanks, David and Sam – and your crew – for hosting us!

A fresh look at the terminal in Port Rowan

A fellow hobbyist got in touch yesterday to ask if he could use an overall photo of my layout in a presentation he’s doing at a convention in his area – and I was happy to oblige. But I realized that I didn’t have a suitable, current photograph. So off to Port Rowan I went, to shoot a few options for him.

Those are now on the way to him via email, but since I haven’t shared photos of the layout in a while, I thought I’d post them here too.

This photo provides a nice overview of the terminal at Port Rowan. I’ve shot this vantage point before, but not since adding trees to both the left (backdrop) and right (fascia) sides of the yard:

Port Rowan overview

This is another shot I’ve taken before, looking along the turntable lead towards the yard entrance. I like it better now that I have those two large trees in place to the left of the track:

Port Rowan turntable

Here’s a photo of Port Rowan taken from across the aisle at St. Williams. It’s a good overview that emphasizes the spread-out nature of this small branchline terminal:

Port Rowan overview

This next photo is another shot I frequently take – looking up the line from end of track in Port Rowan, at track level. I’ve always liked this shot, but it’s even better with extra trees to frame the scene – including additional trees across the aisle in St. Williams:

Port Rowan - along the track

This final photo is probably the best one to illustrate how the layout fits into the room, but it’s also the weakest in terms of composition – in no small part because the end of the peninsula (closest to the camera) is so unfinished compared to the rest of the layout. The Lynn Valley is out of view to the upper right.

Port Rowan - from end of peninsula

Every so often, I need to photograph the layout to make a record of the progress that I’ve made on it. But I haven’t been doing that lately as other things have taken priority. So I’m grateful that I was approached about sharing some images – and flattered that someone would want to use my layout to illustrate a point in their clinic.

A visit from the Brothers Harper

Yesterday, I hosted Bob Harper, his brother Gerald Harper, and my friend David Woodhead for a layout visit. There are many interesting connections between us.

I first met Gerald when I hosted members of the Toronto Chapter of the Canadian Association of Railway Modellers for an open house back in April of last year. Gerald got in touch recently to let me know his brother Bob was coming to North America from the UK – and bringing his exhibition-style Maine two-foot layout with him. Could they come for a visit? Of course!

Naturally, Bob and I had a lot to talk about – from the mechanics of packing a layout for a plane voyage, to the paperwork required, to how he ended up modelling a Maine two-footer. (I know how that goes – I did it myself, before embarking on the Port Rowan project.)

After a tour of the layout, we retired to Harbord House for dinner. David could not join us, unfortunately, but he did take a few photos when Bob and Gerald were at my house:

Bob Harper at Port Rowan
(Bob inspects a freight extra about to leave Port Rowan)

Gerald Harper at Port Rowan
(Gerald snaps a photo of a CNR self-propelled unit, running on M233’s schedule)

Subsequent to the visit to my basement, Bob and Gerald took Bob’s layout – Franklin in On2 – to the annual Railroad Hobby Show in Springfield, Massachusetts. You can read more about that trip on the MaineOn2 FAQ website.

If you missed Franklin there, you have a couple more chances to see it on this side of The Pond: Bob and his layout will attend the annual Ontario Narrow Gauge Show in Schomberg, Ontario in April and the National Narrow Gauge Convention in Minneapolis, Minnesota in September.