Scrapping St. Thomas

P Oliver - Dec 15 2018

Yesterday, some friends and I made the trip to St. Thomas to visit our buddy Pierre Oliver. It was not just a social visit, mind you – he had a job for us: destroy St. Thomas.

Okay – not the real community, but his 1:87 rendition of it – the last remnant of his previous model railway, based on the Wabash operation through southern Ontario. As I’ve noted on my Achievable Layouts blog, earlier this year Pierre decided to scrap the Wabash in order to model something that better fit his interests and lifestyle: the Southern Pacific’s Clovis Branch between Fresno and Friant, California.

But back to St. Thomas…

The yard where the Wabash exchanged cabooses and crews on its trip across southern Ontario was a focal point of the old layout. It occupied a long peninsula up the middle of the main room – an area destined to become the SP line between East Fresno and Tarpey. For that to happen, Pierre needed to scrape St. Thomas off, down to the basic benchwork, and then haul the detritus out to the garage for eventual disposal. He decided that many hands would make short work – and four of us agreed. Ryan Mendell, Doug Currie and Hunter Hughson joined me for the trip.

P Oliver - Dec 15, 2018
(Pierre works near the west end of St. Thomas, while Ryan, Hunter and Doug lift roadbed east of the yard – and on the opposite side of the peninsula)

P Oliver - Dec 15, 2018
(Take that, back drop! The SP layout plan requires the backdrop to be repositioned, so Pierre and Doug take out their anger issues on the old one. It must be working…)

P Oliver - Dec 15, 2018
(Just a few hours later, the peninsula is stripped to the benchwork and ready for a new life in sunny southern California. The gap in the foreground used to hold a large viaduct at the west end of St. Thomas yard: it will need to be filled in with more benchwork for East Fresno…)

It’s never easy to scrap a model railway – although it helps when one has plans for a new one. And in this case, it’s a terrific decision. The proof of that is in the tremendous progress Pierre has made, and how happy he is with the results. Here is a quick tour…

P Oliver - Staging yard
(The end of the staging area, which represents the edge of Fresno yard. Unlike the Wabash staging, this one deserved the scenic treatment.)

SP 1802
(A “valley malley” – SP 1802 – in the staging yard)

SP 1802 and caboose
(The caboose track and engine facility leads at Fresno – actually, staging)

SP converted boxcar caboose
(The SP converted some boxcars into cabooses. I can only imagine how awful those would’ve been to ride in. Pierre built this example from a Westerfield resin kit)

SP Port Costa roundhouse
(Since the staging yard is being scenicked, it’s a good spot to have a roundhouse for the locomotives. This is an in-progress Banta laser cut kit for the SP roundhouse at Port Costa, California)

NP and DH boxcars
(A couple of Pierre’s Yarmouth Model Works kits in the Fresno staging yard)

Clovis Ice Deck
(There was no ice deck in the real Clovis, but Pierre and I decided such a signature structure would be an asset to operating sessions. This is a Walthers ice hose with Tichy deck kits. The modelled deck is a respectable 4.5 feet long)

Clovis industry
(An in-progress industry in Clovis)

Clovis industry
(An in-progress industry in Clovis)

Clovis station
(A model of an SP standard station from American Model Builders – a good stand-in for the Clovis station)

Clovis industry
(An in-progress industry in Clovis)

Start of the line
(See you next time!)

As I look through the images, I realize I didn’t take any photos of Pierre’s progress at Friant – the opposite end of the line. Oh well: that’s a good excuse to go back, right?

We ended the day with a lovely meal prepared by Pierre’s wife (thanks, Kate!) before heading home. I look forward to seeing the new layout next time I visit!

Ermagerd!

“Ermagerd! I’m at the trrrn shrrr!”

Ermagerd!

All appearances to the contrary, I’m having a great time at the 2018 Great British Train Show. To find out why, click on the photo.

UPDATE: The organizers had a video produced at the show. It’s a nice overview of what was on offer. Roweham appears starting around 22:50…

California Dreamin’ | We’ll always have Perris

As part of my trip to California in mid-September, I squeezed in a brief stop at the restored ATSF train station in Perris. This is something I’m really glad I was able to do – it was a pilgrimage of sorts.

To find out why, visit my Achievable Layouts blog. Just click on the pretty postcard view of the station, below:

Southampton mural

George Dutka recently visited Southampton, Ontario and shared a couple of photographs of a terrific mural painted on the side of one of the old brick mills. Have a look at his blog to see what I mean:

Southampton, Ontario – Mural

I have a model of the subject of this mural, which regularly plies the rails to Port Rowan. So it’s nice to see it captured in a piece of public art – thanks for sharing this, George!

Like Port Rowan, Southampton is another one of those small Ontario towns once served by the CNR that would make a terrific subject for a satisfying layout. In fact, I’ve even drawn up a plan for such a layout, which you can find on my Achievable Layouts blog.

Enjoy if you visit!

Roweham 2017

Roweham 2017
(The passenger train – an auto coach pushed by a 14XX class 0-4-2T – arrives at Roweham)

Those who have read this blog for some time now know that I’m a fan of smaller layouts. I’m far more impressed by a small, thoughtfully-conceived and expertly executed model railway than I am by a half-baked basement-filler. The hobby is not about quantity for me; it’s about quality. In fact, I have a whole other blog devoted to what I call Achievable Layouts.

So it’ll come as no surprise that last Saturday, I was delighted to help my friend Brian Dickey exhibit his 7mm (British O scale – 1:43) masterpiece, “Roweham”, at the annual model railway show organized by the club to which he belongs. Also on hand was my friend Pierre Oliver – who, like me, helped Brian exhibit Roweham at last year’s show. We were joined this year by Ross Oddi. (Great to meet you, Ross!)

Roweham 2017
(Ross, Pierre, and Brian on deck)

Roweham 2017
(Ross deploys Brian’s version of the Galvanick Lucipher to break the train as engineer Pierre prepares his next move. Brian’s layout uses prototypically-correct three-link couplings, which add to the play value)

For me, Brian has really hit all the targets with Roweham. The modelling is excellent, and careful. The design is realistic and relaxed – perfect for a branchline terminal in a Green and Pleasant Land. The locomotives and rolling stock are appropriate for the modelling subject, and run flawlessly. (We had one derailment during the show – the result of buffer lock between a longish 2-6-0 and a short wagon. Brian immediately removed the mogul from service so it would not detract from the presentation.) And the presentation is professional – from the skirting, to the fascia, to Brian’s handsome waistcoat complete with brass GWR buttons. (Since I’m part of the exhibition team, I’ll be happy to follow Brian’s lead and pick up a waistcoat from his supplier.)

Roweham 2017
(An overview of Roweham, from the terminal end)

In short, it’s clear that Brian has made an effort to reward the public for their $5 admission fee – even as he enjoys this layout at home. This also informed Brian’s wise decision to have three people help him exhibit Roweham. He wanted to make sure he could talk to visitors even as the layout continued to operate, and he wanted to make sure everybody had a chance to take a break from operating – a much better situation than one person, standing on his feet for six hours, trying to explain the layout to guests and keep the trains moving.

While it’s a modest design, with just four turnouts, Roweham is already finished to a level rarely seen at exhibition in these parts, and Brian continues to add details. New features this year include a cattle dock, a water tank, a brick workshop, some tractors, and more.

Roweham 2017

Roweham 2017

Meantime, Brian has taken a second pass at things, especially equipment, to give it a tasteful weathering job. All in all, Roweham will only get better each time it’s on display. Here are some more shots from the day…

Roweham 2017

Roweham 2017

Roweham 2017

Roweham 2017

Roweham 2017

Roweham 2017

Roweham 2017

Most modellers I meet are obsessed with quantity. They talk about the number of locomotives they have, or the number of freight cars, or the size of their layout. The first question often asked is, “How big is your layout?” – with emphasis on “big”. How different the hobby would be if we instead started with the question, “What story are you trying to tell?” – and then gauged how well the layout accomplishes that.

Brian’s layout tells a very clear story, and that’s why it succeeds so well.

Roweham 2017

Thanks again, Brian, for letting me be a part of your exhibition!

Railfanning in Woodstock

Last week, Bob Fallowfield, Barry Silverthorn and I visited Woodstock, Ontario to do a bit of rail fanning. We saw many things, including a pair of F units in revenue service and a CN crew working a feed mill.

I’ve posted about our day in Woodstock on my Achievable Layouts blog. Click on the images below to read relevant posts – and enjoy a bit of video, too.

OSR F Units at Woodstock
(Bob bags the F units. Click on the image to read more about these survivors)

CNR switches Purina in Woodstock
(The CNR switches Purina in Woodstock. Click on the image to read more about this)

Roweham by Brian Dickey

Yesterday, my friend Brian Dickey displayed his British 7mm scale (1:43.5) exhibition layout, Roweham, at an area train show – and he asked Pierre Oliver and me if we would like to help him out.

We both jumped at the chance – and we’re really glad we did.

In the process, I learned a lot about British 7mm modelling.

I also took away some lessons from the experience that add to my ideas about designing a layout for exhibition.

I’ve written about the day’s fun on my Achievable Layouts blog – click on the image below to read that report.

 photo Roweham-08_zps8gvfrnyh.jpg

Thanks, Brian and Pierre, for a terrific day out: I look forward to future opportunities to run trains to Roweham!