South Paris Switcher

My friend Ryan Mendell is embarking on a new layout project. Having freelanced for many years, building his delightful Algonquin Railway, Ryan has now been bitten by the prototype bug and is going to build an HO layout based on the Grand Trunk Railway in Maine.

Click on the image, below, to visit his new blog and have a look around. It’s worth the trip!

South Paris Switcher - Header

(I’ve disabled comments on this post, because any comments about Ryan’s new project should really go on his blog.)

CNR 3737 :: more tender work

Someone recently asked me how work was progressing on the CNR 3737 project. The short answer was, “It wasn’t”. The long answer was that Andy Malette and I were both busy with other things and just couldn’t find a free Friday that worked for both of us. That’s fine – it’s a hobby: It fits between the other things in life.

But after a long hiatus, we managed to get together last week and make some progress. This time around, I added railings to the tender:

CNR 3737 Tender Railings

I marked locations for stanchions and soldered a bunch of brass strip in place, leaving each piece longer than needed. I then soldered the railing to the stanchions, using a scrap of strip wood as a non-conductive spacer to make sure they railing was a consistent distance off the tender walls.

My prototype has separate railings along the coal bin, whereas the locomotive Andy is building has one continuous rail that follows the lines from the coal bin down to the rear deck, around the back and back up the other side. I definitely had the easier project.

The rear railing is actually two pieces, soldered in place then trimmed to meet on the stanchion next to the ladder at the back of the tender. the railings simply end behind the coal bin walls.

CNR 3737 Tender Rails

On one of the coal bin railings, a couple of brass fittings are soldered in place at each end. These are the electrical plug-ins for the rear light, which will go on the water tank deck.

After shooting these photos, I did some clean-up. I filed the stanchions flush with the top of the railing. In the process, I managed to break a couple of the solder joints, but the repairs were quick – thanks, in part, to my new low-profile vise, which opens enough to hold an S scale tender body, and which can be used as the grounding point for my resistance soldering unit.

It’s nice to be back at this project. It’s taken a long time and I’m now at the stage where I want to get it done and move onto the next thing. Plus, of course, I want to see the locomotives in action on the S Scale Workshop exhibition layout!

Weathering Heights

What’s special about this CNR ballast hopper?

CNR Ballast Hopper

My friend Matthieu Lachance weathered it using techniques found in the military modelling hobby. Matthieu writes about the experience – and how it’s different from the typical approach employed by railway modelling enthusiasts – on his Hedley Junction blog. Click on the image, above, to read more – it’s worth the trip!

(Rather than steal the discussion, I’ve disabled comments on this post. Join in on Matthieu’s blog, instead!)

As an aside, Pierre Oliver and I just shot a series of segments on weathering for TrainMasters TV, including one on using washes by military supply company AK Interactive. Those segments will air later this year.

Ermagerd!

“Ermagerd! I’m at the trrrn shrrr!”

Ermagerd!

All appearances to the contrary, I’m having a great time at the 2018 Great British Train Show. To find out why, click on the photo.

UPDATE: The organizers had a video produced at the show. It’s a nice overview of what was on offer. Roweham appears starting around 22:50…