Seven years of blogging about Port Rowan

Blog Caveman

Blogs are more properly called “web logs” – and, like a diary, one of their uses is to record significant dates. Like today. Because on August 29, 2011, I made my first post to “Port Rowan in 1:64”.

At the time, I hadn’t yet started my S scale layout – that would happen in October – but I had done enough research into S scale and into the CNR’s line to Port Rowan that I’d decided I would be building a layout in 1:64. I’m very pleased that I did.

The layout isn’t yet finished, although it’s the closest I’ve ever come and I do intend to finish it. After that: who knows? But until that happens, I’ll be sharing my progress here. Thanks to everyone who is following along – and an extra thanks to everyone who has joined in the discussion!

A pair of Seltzers

Well, I’m honoured!

Seltzers x2

Yesterday’s post included a pleasant gift. This website won the 2018 Josh Seltzer Award from the National Association of S Gaugers. Thank you to everyone who made this possible!

As the photo above shows, my blog also won in 2016. Not to make light of these awards, but if I win every other year I’m going to quickly run out of wall space. So here’s the challenge:

If you’re modelling in S scale, and you haven’t already done so… start a blog.

Share your progress on models. Give us a tour of your layout. Share your thoughts on the state of the hobby in general, and of S scale in particular. (If you need some ideas about how to start, check out my post, “Why you should consider blogging“.)

Let others know you’re doing this so they can follow along – by cross-posting to the S Scale newsgroups, S Scale SIG, S Scale groups on social media, etc.

And perhaps in a couple of years, you will be looking for a spot to hang your Josh Seltzer Award!

(Thank you, again, to the members of the NASG for these awards. They’re wonderful!)

Ready to roll

This beast landed with a thump on my doorstep yesterday:

GW Models 10

It’s a 10″ roller built by GW Models in the UK – useful for everything from putting a curl in a sheet of brass for a cab roof, to rolling a boiler for a steam locomotive.

About 15 years ago, I was vacationing in the UK and arranged to visit GW Models to buy a rivet making tool. At the time, I had no need for the roller so I didn’t get one. More recently, I’ve been getting into projects where such a device would be useful – for example, working on the CNR 2-8-2 brass-bashing project, or building equipment for the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from photo-etched kits.

Then in April, I attended the 2018 Great British Train Show to help a friend exhibit his layout. While on a break from running trains, I wandered the hall and had a lovely conversation with another exhibitor. He had a selection of tools on display to show how he built his models – including a roller. We got to talking and I realized that if I wanted to acquire my own roller, I’d better do it sooner rather than later.

GW Models - MRJ Advertisement

GW Models is not online. It’s an old-school operation: You write a letter or phone, and wait for a response. So I found the address in a recent issue of Railway Model Journal, and fired off a letter, asking about the cost of shipping to Canada. And waited. And waited. Perhaps I was too late?

I mentioned to Terry Smith – a friend in the UK – that I was looking for one of these rollers and he graciously offered to call GW to ask about them. With Terry’s help, I was able to purchase the roller.

(The lesson here is not, “Ask Terry”. The lesson is, phone GW Models to place your order. I don’t want Terry’s kindness to me repaid with a deluge of similar requests for help. I should’ve called GW Models in the first place.)

The tool consists of three rollers – two of them parallel to each other and connected by a gear train so they turn in the same direction, at the same speed, when the handle is cranked. The third roller is above and between the first two: It can be moved closer to, or further from, the base rollers to adjust the degree of curvature one puts into the material fed through the tool – and can be removed entirely to allow one to remove a closed tube, such as a boiler, after rolling it on the device. The GW roller can accommodate brass sheet up to 0.020″ thick – more than enough for any projects I will undertake.

This is a heavy tool – about 2KG – and is designed to clamp into a vise as shown in the lead photo. Last year, I restored my father’s Number 0 Record Vise and mounted it on a base that clamps to my work table, so I’m ready to roll.

(Thanks so much for your help, Terry!)