Ready to roll

This beast landed with a thump on my doorstep yesterday:

GW Models 10

It’s a 10″ roller built by GW Models in the UK – useful for everything from putting a curl in a sheet of brass for a cab roof, to rolling a boiler for a steam locomotive.

About 15 years ago, I was vacationing in the UK and arranged to visit GW Models to buy a rivet making tool. At the time, I had no need for the roller so I didn’t get one. More recently, I’ve been getting into projects where such a device would be useful – for example, working on the CNR 2-8-2 brass-bashing project, or building equipment for the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from photo-etched kits.

Then in April, I attended the 2018 Great British Train Show to help a friend exhibit his layout. While on a break from running trains, I wandered the hall and had a lovely conversation with another exhibitor. He had a selection of tools on display to show how he built his models – including a roller. We got to talking and I realized that if I wanted to acquire my own roller, I’d better do it sooner rather than later.

GW Models - MRJ Advertisement

GW Models is not online. It’s an old-school operation: You write a letter or phone, and wait for a response. So I found the address in a recent issue of Railway Model Journal, and fired off a letter, asking about the cost of shipping to Canada. And waited. And waited. Perhaps I was too late?

I mentioned to Terry Smith – a friend in the UK – that I was looking for one of these rollers and he graciously offered to call GW to ask about them. With Terry’s help, I was able to purchase the roller.

(The lesson here is not, “Ask Terry”. The lesson is, phone GW Models to place your order. I don’t want Terry’s kindness to me repaid with a deluge of similar requests for help. I should’ve called GW Models in the first place.)

The tool consists of three rollers – two of them parallel to each other and connected by a gear train so they turn in the same direction, at the same speed, when the handle is cranked. The third roller is above and between the first two: It can be moved closer to, or further from, the base rollers to adjust the degree of curvature one puts into the material fed through the tool – and can be removed entirely to allow one to remove a closed tube, such as a boiler, after rolling it on the device. The GW roller can accommodate brass sheet up to 0.020″ thick – more than enough for any projects I will undertake.

This is a heavy tool – about 2KG – and is designed to clamp into a vise as shown in the lead photo. Last year, I restored my father’s Number 0 Record Vise and mounted it on a base that clamps to my work table, so I’m ready to roll.

(Thanks so much for your help, Terry!)

6 thoughts on “Ready to roll

    • Good idea, John. I’ve done one better – I’ve scanned the ad from the most recent MRJ and updated my post to include it.
      Cheers!

  1. Trevor, nice slip roller. I’ve found a few here in the US and have yet to purchase as the rollers are a bit wide. What is the diameter of the rollers themselves?
    Thanks…gregg

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