CNR 3737 :: The big pipe, and other progress

CNR 3737 - Prototype Photo

I had some time today, so I put the phone on mute, turned off the computer, and spent the day in my basement workshop. The result is, I made a lot of progress on my CNR 2-8-2 project.

The first order of business was piping…

The big insulated (wrapped) pipe across the top of the locomotive in the prototype photo is the primary reason I picked CNR 3737 to model. This unusual feature was to deliver steam to an appliance at the front of the locomotive that was used to melt snow and ice out of yard switches in the winter. The melters themselves are not visible in the prototype photo – presumably, they were removed in the summer, and this picture was shot in August. But the steam delivery pipe is very obvious.

Months ago, my friend Andy Malette provided me with a length of wrapped pipe from his stash. I straightened it and re-bent it with pliers to approximate the path of the prototype pipe:

CNR 3737 - Snow Melter pipe

I drilled a hole in the steam dome to accept the end of the pipe, then realized that if I soldered it in place, I would never be able to remove the smokebox front. Given that there are lights to install and maintain, this seemed like a bad idea. So, I made sure the pipe was long enough to fit firmly in the steam dome hole, then soldered the pipe to the smokebox front. It now comes off with that front piece, all as a unit. As I add additional details, I will see if this will continue to work. If not, I’ll have to come up with something else.

Now, I have to do more research on the snow melters themselves. Time to go through my CNR steam books, looking at photos…

CNR 3737 - condenser pipes

While piping, I also installed the condenser coil under the running board. This runs from the air pump, behind the feed water heater pump, to the small tank under the running board. It then runs from that tank to the larger tank that’s between the front ladders, on the pilot deck. I bent up the pipe using some 0.032″ wire and mounted it to photo-etched brackets supplied by Andy – although a simple L-shaped piece of brass bar would serve if the brackets were not available.

As a bonus, the pipe to the large air tank is soldered to the short running board next to the smokebox, which helps strengthen this. It has frequently come unsoldered as I work on the locomotive – but it’s not moving now. (I’ll have to come up with a similar pipe to support the running board on the other side.)

Further back, I realized I could add the cover to the steam turret housing, just ahead of the cab. I cut some thin brass sheet to size, rolled one end around a piece of brass rod, and installed it:

CNR 3737 boxtop

Finally, I tackled a fiddly project: the seven triangles that support the cab roof smoke deflector. I cut triangles oversize, tinned them, and soldered them in place. I then ground the backs of them down to size.

CNR 3737 - 7 triangles

This was a messy process, but it worked – although even now I see triangles that need some adjustment. That’s easy enough to do with metal.

While this represents a lot of progress, the biggest step forward is something that can’t be seen in the photos: Namely, that I did this work on my own, without Andy’s guidance. The point of this project, for me, has been to learn how to do this work – and I realize I’m starting to gain the confidence to forge ahead on my own. That’s very good news, because it means I’m internalizing the skill set. I’m certainly no master – and there will be many more sessions with Andy, including one scheduled for tomorrow afternoon – but it feels great that the work is paying off…

Maybe we’ll even get our CNR S-3-a Mikados finished this year? Tonight, it feels like anything’s possible!

1 thought on “CNR 3737 :: The big pipe, and other progress

  1. Looking really good; and nice progress! It seems like such a big challenge, but you’ve shown that even doing a little something at a time, the end result becomes clearer. Thanks for the inspiration.
    Gord

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