New life for a Record 0

Record Vise

Several years ago, as I was preparing my late mother’s home for sale, I liberated my father’s vise from the workbench in the garage.

I knew at some point I’d have use for this vise. I also knew that it was a Number 0 vise from Record, a well-respected English tool-maker – and that it had only been gently used by my dad. Dad wasn’t that talented with tools, but like many guys from his generation he took it upon himself to tackle DIY projects around the home. (If memory serves, dad purchased this vise from Aikenhead’s, a small hardware store chain in the Greater Toronto Area that was purchased by Home Depot in the mid-1990s, becoming the nucleus of HD’s Canadian operation.)

But I also knew the vise needed some restoration work – primarily, cleaning and a new coat of paint – and I had other projects on the go. So it sat in a box for a while.

But then a couple of things happened. Last year, I got serious about setting up my shop. And more recently, I’ve been learning to rework brass locomotives, and a good vise is a valuable tool, especially when using the resistance soldering gear.

So, the vise came out of storage. Last week, while my friend and fellow tool enthusiast Chris Abbott was over for a visit, we set about taking apart the vise so that I could restore it.

Record Vise
(Major components of the vise. Smaller items – not shown – include a spring, a couple of pins, a washer…)

There was a fair bit of rust and oily dirt/sawdust inside. That oil probably kept the important bits from rusting, although a threaded insert at the back of the vise needed special attention with scrapers before we could remove it to pull the sliding jaw from the body.

With everything disassembled, I tackled cleaning, and then roughing up the surface with sanding sticks and a brass wire wheel in a drill to help the new paint adhere. I was careful to not hit the machined surfaces with the wheel!

Record Vise

For paint, washed the vise with household cleaner then dried it with paper towels. Then I warmed the vise in an oven (200F – put it in when I turned on the oven and pulled it out when the oven reached temperature – it was warm but could be handled with bare hands). I did this because as a large casting, the vise would get pretty cold in a basement in the winter, and the paint needed to go on a warmer surface. It worked well.

I gave the vise a coat of Tremclad rust-proofing primer and then – since I could not easily get proper Record blue paint (also known as Roundel Blue, which was the colour used in the round “target” markings on British aircraft during the Second World War) – I followed the primer with a coat of Tremclad Dark Blue rust-proofing paint.

The final task was to make a base for the vise. I don’t want to permanently mount it on my work surface – and I don’t have to, since the surface has plenty of dog-holes in it to anchor things. For the base, I laminated together three layers of poplar plywood, then cut and sanded the block to shape before applying a sealing coat of low-glare satin Varathane. Three 5/16″ bolts secure the vise to the base – one on each side, and one under the moving jaw at the back of the vise. The underside of the base is countersunk to accommodate the nuts, which are held in place with semi-permanent Lok-Tite. Washers spread the pressure. It’s not moving unless I want it to!

Record Vise

I carefully sized the base so that when it’s in use, it fits between the pattern of dog holes on my Festool Multi-Fuction Table (MFT). In this way, I can use up to four clamps on it to secure it in place. As the photo above suggests, two is more than sufficient.

Also apparent in the above photo, I shaped the base so that the front edge projects over the edge of the MFT. The angled shape to either side of the vise means I won’t bump the base with my thigh while standing and using the tool. And the projection was designed so that the fixed jaw of the vise would sit just proud of the tracks that run around the perimeter of the MFT:

Record Vise

Of course, if I’m not working a piece of material that is going to hang down below the base, I can position this vise anywhere on the MFT, thanks to all of those dog holes.

Thanks for the help getting started on this project, Chris – and for the useful advice throughout. I’m really pleased with how this project turned out, and I’m looking forward to putting dad’s vise to good use!

6 thoughts on “New life for a Record 0

    • Not at all! It’s ready for use. Restoring the vise is no different than keeping a car in good repair, I think. I expect the vise will suffer dings to the paint, etc., and as that happens, I’ll do touch-ups to prevent bare metal from rusting. Meantime, I know I’ve cleaned and oiled the mechanism so it’s ready to provide good service to me – and at some point in the future, I’ll give it another tune-up as needed.
      Cheers!

  1. Personally speaking, I think it is good to have a variety of vices, clean or not…

    (I have a Record no 1 – because the shop I bought it from did not have a no 0 in stock – dating from 35 years ago, and it has served me proud. quality tools are an investment.)

    • I have some smaller vises too – machinist’s tools, mostly. At least one of them needs attention, so I have another project…

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