Cooling the DCC drawer

From the moment I purchased it last year, my current DCC system – the ECoS 50200 from ESU – has lived in a cabinet under my staging yard, which is also how I store my large and growing collection of S scale rolling stock.

The rolling stock storage cabinets are kitchen drawers from IKEA, chosen for their capacity and their soft close mechanisms:

Car Storage by IKEA
(Click on the image to read about my car storage solution)

Ordering from IKEA is like eating at the gourmet burger bar. You build your own – mixing and matching cabinet fronts, drawer sizes, and so on. For my stock storage cabinets, I chose the Marsta drawer fronts primarily because they have recessed handles: I didn’t want people catching their pant legs on handles that projected into the aisle.

But I also picked them because the fronts have removable inserts to allow one to choose the colour of the recess in the handle. I didn’t care about the colour – but I did like the idea of being able to leave the handle open to allow air to circulate in the drawer where the DCC system resides.

Air circulation through the drawer front.
(That’s the glow of the DCC system, seen through the open drawer front)

This has worked fine for 10 months of the year, but this summer it got so hot in the layout room – despite it being in a basement – that the ECoS was overheating and shutting down. Obviously, some active cooling was required.

I talked over the problem with Matt Herman from ESU and based on that discussion, I picked up a pair of computer case fans from a local electronics supply house, plus a 12-volt wall wart to power them. I’ve attached them to the drawer with double-sided foam tape (to dampen vibration), and aimed them so they blow directly on the back of the ECoS 50200:

DCC Cooling fans.
(Not pretty – my wiring never is – but effective!)

The power supply for the fans is plugged into the same power bar as the DCC system, so they run whenever the DCC system is turned on. There’s a gap between the top of the drawer at the back, and the top of the case, so fresh air is drawn in from the back of the drawer and blown out through the drawer handle. I can definitely feel the breeze blowing out the front of the drawer, and they’re pretty quiet – especially with the drawer fully closed.

This solution would work well for any DCC system, of course…

One of the nice things about the ECoS 50200 command station is that one can monitor its operation – including the voltage and current being drawn, and the internal operating temperature. Therefore, I’ll be able to easily assess the effectiveness of my cooling solution:

ECoS operation settings screen
(33 Celcius – and holding!)

Thanks for the advice, Matt!

5 thoughts on “Cooling the DCC drawer

  1. Trevor,

    Could you tell me how deep the IKEA shelves are that you used for car storage? I’m modeling in 1:48 and I’m thinking I can get away with any less than 6″ to be safe.

    Love following your progress!

    • Hi Patrick:
      I suspect the drawers I used would be too shallow for O scale equipment. I’m travelling right now so I can’t confirm their size. However, IKEA will have all the relevant dimensions on their website…
      Cheers!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please prove you're not a nasty spamming robot thingy * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.