HEPC: Freight Motor E21

HEPC E21

While working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada in September, I found a number of images from the Queenston Power Canal Construction Railway – operated by Ontario’s Hydro-Electric Power Commission.

As noted previously, this railway was a electric line that once operated in the Niagara Region – and which supplied a few freight motors to the Niagara St. Catharines and Toronto Railway.

One of these motors was E21. The HEPC acquired this Baldwin-Westinghouse 55-ton freight motor second-hand in 1919 from the Auburn & Syracuse Railway in New York State. It went to the Toronto & York Railway as its #2 in 1924 before ended up back in the Niagara Region in 1927, as the NS&T 18.

NST 18 - Welland Avenue Yard

NS&T 18 – Welland Avenue yard, St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown

NST 18 and 41 - Welland Avenue Yard

NS&T 18 and express car 41 – Welland Avenue yard, St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown

When the wire came down in 1960, the CNR forwarded this freight motor to the Oshawa Railway as its #18. This freight motor was fortunate enough to go into preservation, when it was sold to an enthusiast and ended up at the Connecticut Trolley Museum in 1964. It’s still there today.

In the archives, I found a book of photos that also included information about each piece of HEPC equipment. I believe this book was an evaluation of the equipment for insurance or possibly sale purposes. Here is the page from that book that provides details of E21:

HEPC E21 Data

With this post, I think I have exhausted my material on the HEPC Queenston Power Canal Construction Railway. (If you missed any posts, you can find them all using the HEPC – Construction Railway category link.) I hope you’ve enjoyed this look at this short-lived yet interesting electrified construction railway in Ontario’s Niagara Peninsula.

HEPC: Steam Crane #6

HEPC Steam Crane

While working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada in September, I found a number of images from the Queenston Power Canal Construction Railway – operated by Ontario’s Hydro-Electric Power Commission.

As noted previously, this railway was an interesting electric line that once operated in the Niagara Region. The railway’s primary purpose was to remove and dispose of material as shovels dug the power canal. As such, dump cars dominated the line’s roster – and I wrote about those in an earlier post in this series. But other industrial equipment was needed too – including this steam crane, #6.

(I don’t see any number on the crane – but as noted below, this one was assigned “#6” – so that’s what I’m calling it. While it’s difficult to see in the lead photo, the letting on the cab reads “Hydro Electric Power Commission”.)

The crane is coupled to an unidentified HEPC steam locomotive. While the HEPC used many electric freight motors, it did have steam engines on the roster too, although I don’t have any information about those.

I do not know the disposition of this crane – other than that it did not make it onto the NS&T roster.

In the archives, I found a book of photos that also included information about each piece of HEPC equipment. I believe this book was an evaluation of the equipment for insurance or possibly sale purposes. Here is the page from that book that provides details for Steam Crane #6:

HEPC Steam Crane

I have more photos of HEPC equipment with their valuations, and will share them in the coming days.

HEPC: Freight Motors E1-E12

HEPC - E1

While working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada in September, I found a number of images from the Queenston Power Canal Construction Railway – operated by Ontario’s Hydro-Electric Power Commission.

As noted previously, this railway was an interesting electric line that once operated in the Niagara Region – and which supplied a few freight motors to the Niagara St. Catharines and Toronto Railway.

The NS&T rostered two freight motors – the second #16, and the #17 – that were originally built by National Steel Car Company of Hamilton for the Queenston power canal project.

HEPC freight motor E9 was sold to the NS&T in 1926, and became its #17:

NST 17 - Welland Avenue

Another HEPC freight motor became the NS&T’s second #16 – although we don’t know which locomotive it was on the HEPC roster. The second 16 arrived on the NS&T in 1926 and received a new cab in 1930.

NST 16 - Welland Avenue

The revised John Mills book on the NS&T notes that the second 16 was a National Steel Car Company product, which would make it one of the E1 to E12 series. Of this series, we’ve accounted for E9 (which became NS&T 17). Mills notes E7, E11 and E12 ended up on the International Nickel Company (INCO) railway in Sudbury. I have no information about the disposition of the rest (E1-E6, E8, and E10).

In the archives, I found a book of photos that also included information about each piece of HEPC equipment. I believe this book was an evaluation of the equipment for insurance or possibly sale purposes. Here is the page from that book that provides details of the first six National Steel Car freight motors – E1 to E6. I assume E7 to E12 were similar:

HEPC - E1-E6

I have more photos of HEPC equipment with their valuations, and will share them in the coming days.

HEPC: Freight Motors E13-E18

HEPC - E17

While working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada in September, I found a number of images from the Queenston Power Canal Construction Railway – operated by Ontario’s Hydro-Electric Power Commission.

As noted previously, this railway was an interesting electric line that once operated in the Niagara Region.

Among the HEPC’s roster were a half-dozen motors – E13 to E18 – built in 1919 by Canadian Car & Foundry of Montreal. None of these made it to the NS&T roster: According to the revised John Mills book on the NS&T, E13 to E17 were among the HEPC motors sold in 1926 to the International Nickel Company (INCO) in Sudbury. I have not found any information about the disposition of E18.

In the archives, I found a book of photos that also included information about each piece of HEPC equipment. I believe this book was an evaluation of the equipment for insurance or possibly sale purposes. Here is the page from that book that provides details of the CC&F freight motors:

HEPC - E13-E18

I have more photos of HEPC equipment with their valuations, and will share them in the coming days.

HEPC: Dump Cars

While working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada in September, I found a number of images from the Queenston Power Canal Construction Railway – operated by Ontario’s Hydro-Electric Power Commission.

As noted previously, this railway was an interesting electric line that once operated in the Niagara Region – and which supplied a few freight motors to the Niagara St. Catharines and Toronto Railway.

The railway’s primary purpose was to remove and dispose of material as shovels dug the power canal. As such, dump cars dominated the line’s roster. Chapter 18 of the revised John Mills book on the NS&T notes that the construction railway had 250 such cars at its peak. The locomotives were equipped with extra air tanks and high-capacity compressors to provide the air necessary not only for braking but also to operate the dump cars.

In the archives, I found a book of photos that also included information about each piece of HEPC equipment. I believe this book was an evaluation of the equipment for insurance or possibly sale purposes. Here are the valuations covering 220 dump cars of three types, all used on the construction railway:

HEPC - Dump Cars 1-150

HEPC - Dump Cars 151-200

HEPC - Dump Cars 201-220

I have more photos of HEPC equipment with their valuations, and will share them in the coming days.

HEPC: Jordan Spreader #1

HEPC - Jordan Spreader 1

HEPC Jordan Spreader 1 – November 7, 1919. Photographer unknown.

While working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada in September, I found a number of images from the Queenston Power Canal Construction Railway – operated by Ontario’s Hydro-Electric Power Commission.

As noted in yesterday’s post, this railway was an interesting electric line that once operated in the Niagara Region – and which supplied a few freight motors to the Niagara St. Catharines and Toronto Railway.

To the best of my knowledge, the Jordan Spreader that is the subject of this post did not end up on the NS&T (although the freight motor behind it – HEPC 21 – did, as NS&T 18). But since I found a number of interesting photographs of the operation in the archives, I’ve decided I’ll add them to my website.

This photograph was part of a book that also included information about each piece of equipment. I believe this book was an evaluation of the equipment for insurance or possibly sale purposes. Here’s the full page that accompanied the above photograph:

HEPC Jordan Spreader 1 - full page

I have more photos of HEPC equipment with their valuations, and will share them in the coming days.

I’ve also created the “HEPC – Construction Railway” category to capture all of the posts related to this line. You can also find this in the “Categories” menu in the right hand column on the home page.

HEPC Queenston Railway

HEPC-Jordan Spreader

A HEPC freight motor and Jordan Spreader work on the Queenston Power Canal Construction Railway. Photographer and date unknown.

The Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway acquired its freight motors from a variety of sources. Three locomotives – NS&T 16, 17 and 18 – arrived on the property via the Queenston Power Canal Construction Railway. This railway – built by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission (HEPC) of Ontario – operated for three years (1918-1921) with the sole purpose of helping to excavate a power canal designed to drive the hydro-electric generating station at Queenston, Ontario. Chapter 18 of the revised John Mills book on the NS&T provides a good capsule history of the railway, so I won’t repeat it here.

While working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada in September, I found a number of images from the construction railway.

HEPC-E1

HEPC E1. Photographer and date unknown.

HEPC-E3

HEPC E3. Photographer and date unknown.

HEPC-E9

HEPC E9. Photographer and date unknown.

The construction railway rostered 12 of these handsome steeple cab electrics – built in 1918 by National Steel Car Company of Hamiton, Ontario. These 50-ton models were 35 feet long.

Note the four trolley poles on each motor: this was required because the overhead wire was mounted off-centre to keep it out of the way of shovels while loading dump cars. The photograph of E9 clearly shows this.

Note also that these freight motors are fitted with large air tanks – again, this is clearly seen in the photograph of E9. These freight motors often handled cuts of eight-to-10 air-operated dump cars, and needed extra air capacity not only to provide sufficient braking but also to be able to power the dump mechanisms.

Of these 12 engines, one – E9 – was sold to the NS&T in 1926, and became the railway’s #17. Its heritage is clear:

NS&T 17 - Welland Car Barn

NS&T 17 – Welland Car Barn, St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

The NS&T 17 should not be confused with the HEPC 17, which has a very different history:

HEPC-E17

HEPC E17. Photographer and date unknown.

This engine was part of a 1919 order (E13 to E18) from Canadian Car & Foundry in Montreal. These were also 50-ton freight motors, but were 41 feet long over all.

HEPC-E15

HEPC E15. Photographer and date unknown.

E15 and E17 were amongst the freight motors that the HEPC sold to the International Nickel Company in Sudbury in 1926.

The HEPC also ended up supplying a boxcab-style freight motor to the NS&T:

HEPC-E21

HEPC E21. Photographer and date unknown.

The HEPC acquired this Baldwin-Westinghouse 55-ton freight motor second-hand in 1919 from the Auburn & Syracuse Railway in New York State. It went to the Toronto & York Railway as its #2 in 1924 before ended up back in the Niagara Region in 1927, as the NS&T 18. When the wire came down in 1960, the CNR forwarded this freight motor to the Oshawa Railway as its #18. This freight motor was fortunate enough to go into preservation, when it was sold to an enthusiast and ended up at the Connecticut Trolley Museum in 1964.

nullCT Trolley Museum 18
(Click on the image above to read more about the 18 at the Connecticut Trolley Museum website)

There’s one other ex-HEPC locomotive that made it onto the NS&T roster, as the line’s Second #16. Unfortunately, it’s not known which HEPC locomotive this was. What is known, according to Mills, is that it arrived in 1926 and received a new cab in 1930. The rebuilt locomotive is immediately recognizable as it has four windows along the cab side:

NST 16 - Welland Ave Car Barns

NS&T 16 – Welland Avenue car barns, St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

Number 16 ended up in Oshawa in 1960 – then went to Noranda Mines Ltd. in 1965.

While not directly related to the NS&T, my visit to Library and Archives Canada also turned up the following pictures of the construction of the Queenston power canal:

HEPC-Hanging Wire

HEPC-Steam Train

HEPC-Charles Boone

NST 41 – Geneva Street Terminal (II)

I’m working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada. Here’s one of my findings:

NST 41 - Geneva St Terminal

NS&T 41 – St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

I gave this post’s title the “(II)” addendum because it’s not the first time I’ve shared a photo of this freight motor at the main passenger terminal. Back in April, I shared another picture, reproduced below:

NS&T 41 - St. Catharines Terminal
(Click on the image for more information)

In both photos, the express motor is in a similar spot. It’s on one of the stub tracks. But the black and white picture that’s the subject of today’s post is obviously from an earlier time in the railway’s life, because there are still canopies over all the platform. In the colour photo, the canopies have been removed. (In fact, it looks like some of the through tracks to the right have also been pulled up.)

There are some neat details in this picture, including an electric light under the canopy – just to the right of the freight motor. That’s good to know for anybody interested in modelling this handsome yet little-used passenger terminal.

As always, you can check the categories menu on the home page for more posts about specific subjects – including Express Motor 41, the Geneva Street Terminal and The Andrew Merrilees Collection.

NS&T Brill cars at Port Dalhousie

I’m working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada*. Among my findings are a number of photos of the NS&T at Port Dalhousie – including the views shared here:

NST 326 - Port Dalhousie

NS&T 326 – Port Dalhousie. Photographer and date unknown.

NST 324 - Port Dalhousie

NS&T 324 – Port Dalhousie. Photographer and date unknown.

These two photos are looking east in the ferry dock yard at Port Dalhousie – and while they’re fairly standard views of NS&T equipment, I like that they show some details of the terminal building on the right side of the photos. This was on the water’s edge and was where people would shelter while waiting to board the NS&T lake boats headed for Toronto.

NST 324 - Port Dalhousie

NS&T 324 – Port Dalhousie. Photographer and date unknown.

Here’s another view of 324 in the ferry dock yard, this time looking west. The photographer may have been standing in front of the terminal building shown in the earlier photos.

This photo is from a different era than the previous picture of 324 – note the bars over the lower windows on the car in this picture (and the kid demonstrating how they don’t quite keep arms in).

The building behind the 324 (at left) was one of many framing this yard area. I have better photo of that building, which I’ll share in a future post.

The two cars shown in these views were part of the 320 series (320-326). These 52-seat suburban cars were built by Brill in 1917 for the Washington-Virginia Railway. The NS&T acquired them in 1929. They were 48’4″ long, weighed 56,200 lbs, and rode on 6′ trucks spaced 21’6″ apart. Car 323 was scrapped in 1945, while the rest were transferred to the Montreal & Southern Counties (another CNER property) in 1947, and scrapped in 1956.

NS&T 320-326 were known as the “Washington” cars, and in his revised book on the NS&T, author John Mills describes them as the most versatile cars the railway ever owned – noting they could handle local or suburban services, and were even used in mainline extras when required. They were favourites for the Port Dalhousie route.

*Earlier this month, I joined my friends Jeff Young and Peter Foley on a visit to Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa to do a dive into the astonishing Andrew Merrilees Collection. (Thanks to both gentlemen for helping to make my first visit to the archives a successful and enjoyable journey of discovery.)

Drawing on a finding aid compiled by Ottawa-area railway historian Colin Churcher, I tracked down and copied numerous photos of the Niagara St. Catharines and Toronto Railway and its predecessor lines. As part of the Merrilees collection at LAC, these are free to distribute with proper attribution, so I’ll be sharing my findings on this blog as time permits. To that end, I’ve created the Andrew Merrilees Collection category, so readers may find all posts related to this incredible archive of railway history.

Two views of the car barn yard

I’m working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada*. My findings included a couple of images taken from opposite ends of the main track that ran through the car barn yard on Welland Avenue in St. Catharines:

NST - Welland Avenue - Southwest

NS&T – car barn yard, St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

A few days ago, I posted an image of NS&T 301 – and at the time, I was unsure of where the photo was taken. This image solved the mystery for me (and I’ve since gone back and updated that post). The unknown photographer is standing at the northeast corner of the yard on Welland Avenue, looking southwest along the main tracks that swing off the road and pass through the yard. The trespassing sign, switch stand and corner of the carbarn – at left – can clearly be seen in the photo of 301 linked to above.

I wish this photo was more clear, because there’s a lot going on in it. Just to the right of the car barn is a small shed and what could be a pile of sand. The barn leads are packed with equipment. What appears to be a 130-series car is preparing to leave the yard. This image also provides a good view of the fabricated metal poles used to support the overhead wires along parts of the NS&T.

To the right in the distance is the freight house that once stood on the property. I believe this dates from the days of the steam-powered St. Catharines and Niagara Central Railway. As noted elsewhere on this website, the NS&T’s freight house was located on Niagara Street.

NST - Court Street - Northwest

NS&T car barn yard, St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

In this view, the photographer is standing on Clark Street and looking northeast into the car barn shooting along the main track, from the opposite direction of the photo above. This was possibly the same photographer, as one can see what appears to be a 130-series car on the main track (partially obscured by the trespassing sign). Again, there’s a lot of equipment in the yard.

At one time, the main track through the yard continued across Clark Street and down Raymond to James, forming one of the many loops through downtown St. Catharines. I don’t know when the railway lifted the track on Raymond.

For those unfamiliar with the car barn area, this St. Catharines fire map puts everything in perspective:

Fire Map - Welland Avenue car barns

*Earlier this month, I joined my friends Jeff Young and Peter Foley on a visit to Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa to do a dive into the astonishing Andrew Merrilees Collection. (Thanks to both gentlemen for helping to make my first visit to the archives a successful and enjoyable journey of discovery.)

Drawing on a finding aid compiled by Ottawa-area railway historian Colin Churcher, I tracked down and copied numerous photos of the Niagara St. Catharines and Toronto Railway and its predecessor lines. As part of the Merrilees collection at LAC, these are free to distribute with proper attribution, so I’ll be sharing my findings on this blog as time permits. To that end, I’ve created the Andrew Merrilees Collection category, so readers may find all posts related to this incredible archive of railway history.