NST 41 – Geneva Street Terminal (II)

I’m working my way through photographs of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway from the Andrew Merrilees Collection at Library and Archives Canada. Here’s one of my findings:

NST 41 - Geneva St Terminal

NS&T 41 – St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

I gave this post’s title the “(II)” addendum because it’s not the first time I’ve shared a photo of this freight motor at the main passenger terminal. Back in April, I shared another picture, reproduced below:

NS&T 41 - St. Catharines Terminal
(Click on the image for more information)

In both photos, the express motor is in a similar spot. It’s on one of the stub tracks. But the black and white picture that’s the subject of today’s post is obviously from an earlier time in the railway’s life, because there are still canopies over all the platform. In the colour photo, the canopies have been removed. (In fact, it looks like some of the through tracks to the right have also been pulled up.)

There are some neat details in this picture, including an electric light under the canopy – just to the right of the freight motor. That’s good to know for anybody interested in modelling this handsome yet little-used passenger terminal.

As always, you can check the categories menu on the home page for more posts about specific subjects – including Express Motor 41, the Geneva Street Terminal and The Andrew Merrilees Collection.

NS&T 41 (green) – Welland Avenue yard

In a previous post, I shared a couple of photos of Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway express motor 41 at the Welland Avenue yard in St. Catharines – in a red paint scheme. In its final years, this motor wore a handsome CNR passenger green – as seen in these pictures from the collection of photographs, maps and other materials I’ve recently acquired from William Flatt:

NST 41 - Welland Avenue

NS&T 41 – St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

NST 18 and 41 - Welland Avenue

NS&T 18 and NS&T 41 – St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

There was always a wide variety of equipment in the car barn yard on Welland Avenue in St. Catharines. Tomorrow, I’ll share a couple more photos of equipment that called the yard home – at least, in later years…

NS&T 41 (red) – Welland Avenue yard

In yesterday’s post, I shared an image of Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway number 41. Here are a couple more views of that express motor from the collection of photographs, maps and other materials I’ve recently acquired from William Flatt:

NST 41 - Welland Avenue

NS&T 41 – St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

NST 41 - Welland Avenue

NS&T 41 – St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

In these two views, NS&T 41 is resting in the yard at the Welland Avenue car barn in St. Catharines.

Number 41 was built by the Cleveland, Painesville & Ashtalbula in 1917 as its number 60. The NS&T acquired it in 1927 and undertook a significant rebuilding of the car. It was originally a wooden car, but later received steel sheathing.

Number 41 survived in red paint at least until 1952: it was painted into green sometime before 1957, and withdrawn from service in 1958.

I don’t know its ultimate fate, but I assume – like most of the NS&T equipment – it was scrapped sometime after the power was shut off in 1960. This express motor was part of the famous “funeral procession” photographs – depicting a string of equipment headed for scrap, led by NS&T 20, in 1959.

NS&T 41 – Geneva Street Terminal

Many photos were taken of the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway and most of the best ones have been published – often several times. But occasionally, a rare one pops up. That’s the case with this photo – new to me – which I found in the collection of photographs, maps and other materials I’ve recently acquired from William Flatt:

NS&T 41 - St. Catharines Terminal

NS&T 41 – St. Catharines. Photographer and date unknown.

NS&T express motor 41 sits on the back track at the railroad’s main terminal in St. Catharines.

The photographer is standing on the southeast side of the terminal, looking northwest towards the building. Geneva Street is on the far side of the structure, while Welland Avenue is to the left.

As noted in a previous post, there were six tracks in the terminal – three stub-end spurs, and three through sidings. Comparing this photo to the map of the terminal trackage on page 48 of the revised book by John Mills and counting from right to left, express motor 41 is sitting on the stub track between platforms 3 and 4. A through track runs past the right (north) side of platform 3, and continues up the Grantham Division to Port Dalhousie East.

To the left, the track between platforms 4 and 5 still exists but it appears the track between 5 and 6, at extreme left, has been filled in: Note the two automobiles parked under the canopy. One of these is a police car, and in a discussion on the NS&T Facebook Group a member mentioned that for a while, the terminal was used by the RCMP. (I’m trying to pin down the dates for that and will update this post if I’m successful.)

Between the steel express motor and the stub-end terminal with covered platforms, this photo really reminds me of the O scale modelling of the late Bob Hegge on his Crooked Mountain Lines.

I’ll post more about NS&T 41 tomorrow.