St. Catharines: CNR track maps (1980s)

I grew up in St. Catharines in the 1980s, and that’s the era I remember on the Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway. Of course, by that time the trolley wire had been gone for a couple of decades – it came down in 1960 – and much else had changed. Customers disappeared, and new customers were added. Trackage was rearranged – often with new connections made. And so on.

Still, any knowledge of “what was there” can only be a good thing. Years ago, I collected a set of CNR track maps – including associated indexes that identify each track. Here’s what I have. Note how each zone map includes the links to adjacent zones.

Zone MM
This 1983 map covers the transfer yard at Merritton, where the NS&T interchanged with the CNR.

Zone MM - Map

Zone MM - Index

Zone MG
Moving north from Merritton Yard, the line’s hub of operations was the Eastchester Yard area. This map is from 1985.

Zone MG - Map

Zone MG - Index

Zone ML
This map, from 1981, covers the area east of Eastchester Yard and up to Port Weller on the Welland Canal.

Zone ML - Map

Zone ML - Index

Zone MP
This map, from 1983, covers the track along Louisa Street and up Ontario Street to serve McKinnon’s (General Motors).

Zone MP - Map

Zone MP - Index

I’m grateful that I have these. I can compare them to other sources – such as the 1923 Fire Maps I recently found online – to develop a better picture of the NS&T in the electric era.

2 thoughts on “St. Catharines: CNR track maps (1980s)”

  1. Great extra references. Thanks for posting. I still can’t believe how many industries were served by rail in one area. Cheers, Gord

    1. Hi Gord:
      Yes, the NS&T was pretty busy. At its peak, it moved approximately 400 freight cars per day.
      St. Catharines was a hub of industrial activity at one time. Welland was no slouch, either. I guess they were both well-positioned between the steel-making powerhouse of Hamilton and the US border. Plus, they had good water resources – both for power (that 300-foot drop over the escarpment) and transport (the Welland Canal).
      Cheers!

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